I have the heart and stomach of a king

I grieve and dare not show my discontent,
I love and yet am forced to seem to hate,
I do, yet dare not say I ever meant,
I seem stark mute but inwardly to prate.
I am and not, I freeze and yet am burned.
Since from myself another self I turned.

My care is like my shadow in the sun,

As for my own part, I care not for death, for all men are mortal; and though I be a woman, yet I have as good a courage answerable to my place as ever my father had. I am your anointed queen. I will never be by violence constrained to do anything. I thank God I am indeed endued with such qualities that if I were turned out of the realm in my petticoat, I were able to live in any place of Christendom.

Queen Elizabeth I

A Speech to a Joint Delegation of Lords and Commons, November 5, 1566

(via q-u-o-t-a-t-i-o-n-s)

Elizabeth Fact:

Elizabeth was the Third Longest reneging Monarch of England lasting 44 years.

I love your blog! And I love Elizabeth! Do you know if any of her dresses survive today? I would love to see them.
Anonymous

Sorry for the delay,  I’ve been busy with work.   After the Death of Elizabeth in 1603, her vast collection of dresses went to Anne of Denmark Wife of King James.  Currently the only thing that exists to my knowledge is riding gloves, stockings, (which you can find at Hatfeild House)  a corset and a pair of her Pearls are attached to the State Crown Queen Elizabeth II wears to open Parliament.

Riding Gloves— http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2138924/The-royal-wave-Queen-Elizabeth-Is-coronation-gauntlet-goes-Selfridges-London.html

 Corset- - http://www.elizabethi.org/us/wardrobe/corset.htm

On this day: Queen Elizabeth I establishes Church of England

February 27 – Queen Elizabeth I of England establishes the Church of England, with the Act of Uniformity 1558 and the Act of Supremacy 1559. The Oath of Supremacy is reinstated.

Queen Elizabeth I’s Final Year’s

The 1590s proved a difficult decade for Elizabeth. The question of how to govern Ireland had created terrible problems for the Queen over the years but 1594 saw the start of the Nine Years War in which hundreds of English troops were killed. Elizabeth sent out the impetuous Earl of Essex who only managed to create further difficulties. Her most trusted ministers, including Burghley and Walsingham, passed away. Leicester, to whom she had remained close, died in 1588 and Elizabeth kept his last letter beside her bed until her own death.

The Queen herself was not as sharp as she once had been. Ministers often dealt with matters without consulting her, and she became paranoid about the threat of assassination. But by now Elizabeth was nearly seventy. Her health deteriorated and, when death came on 24 March 1603, it was: ‘mildly like a lamb, easily like a ripe apple from the tree’. The crown passed to the Protestant King James VI of Scotland who became King James I of England.

vivalundinproductions:

 
Queen Elizabeth I
Portrait Bust

vivalundinproductions:

Queen Elizabeth I
Portrait Bust
Katherine was the closest to her in age of all her stepmothers and they  were also bound by ties of kinship. But Elizabeth’s good grace was no  doubt due to the pragmatic approach that she had learned from Anne of  Cleves.  Her objective was to be received back into the court - and her  father’s favour - and she knew that flattering the Queen was an  effective way of achieving this.

Katherine was the closest to her in age of all her stepmothers and they were also bound by ties of kinship. But Elizabeth’s good grace was no doubt due to the pragmatic approach that she had learned from Anne of Cleves. Her objective was to be received back into the court - and her father’s favour - and she knew that flattering the Queen was an effective way of achieving this.

Fashion of Queen Elizabeth I

Queen Elizabeth was notorious   follower of fashion. While in private she preferred to wear simple gowns, and would even  wear the same plain gown for two or three days, when she was in public, she dressed to impress. Clothes were an important status symbol to the Elizabethans, and a person had to dress in accordance with their social status. It was thus in keeping that the Queen dressed more magnificent than everyone else. No one was allowed to rival the Queen’s appearance, and one unfortunate maid of honor was reprimanded for wearing a gown that was too sumptuous for her. The maids were meant to complement the Queen’s appearance, not to outshine her.